How to prune Muscadine Vines

Smith's Nature Friendly Farm
Brookhaven, MS
Smith's Nature Friendly Farm
Brookhaven, MS
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How to prune Muscadine Vines

Smith's Nature Friendly Farm
Published by Jollean Smith in Garden · 7 March 2022
Tags: MuscadinesScuppernogsPruningGardeningFruitBerries

First off, let me quickly introduce you to the Muscadine. Some might call it a Scuppernong. They are native to the South and really easy to grow. As a Canadian in the South I was suprised that I had never tried one before. They are absolutley delicious. I personally think they taste better than a standard grocerie store grape. Their only downfall is that they are seedy. So a lot like your favorite watermelon, you just have to get used to eating them outdoors, spitting the seeds as you go.

When we purchased our property, we inherited two older vines. Plus, we added two more and one just appeared. So we now have 5 vines. Each August, early September we get buckets full of the Muscadines. We use them making Muscadine jam, syrup, drying the skins for smoothies and of course just eating them fresh!

To maintain a Muscadine, every January or February you will need to prune the vines. It's a little time consuming but a relatively easy task.
Step 1 - Identify your main trunk.
You do not want to cut your main line for your vine. This is the one that will grow the farthest. If you plant is young you will want to pick on main line and trim the rest to allow all the energy to be focused on the one line.



Step 2 - Cut the vines coming off of your main line, from the second node onward.
Once you know what not to cut, you can start cutting everything else. Find any pieces growing off the vine and start cutting from 2 nodes in. It will feel like you are pruning too much. I promise you, you are not. Muscadine vines are vigerous growers. You will trim everything poking out along the main line. If you have a large older vine, you may have multiple main lines. You can decide to keep them and just trim their shoots or if you feel it is crowding you main line too much, go ahead and clean it up.



At the same time as I prune my vines, I will add sheep manure to the base of the tree and on the ground following your main line. If I have a little extra sheep manure in the year I may do that more than once in a year.

Becuase Muscadines are native I never water them. They are in their desired climate in the South. They are honestly, one of the easiest vines to grow here.

That's really it. If you are not growing these guys, I highly recommend it.

Thanks for being here. Be friendly. Be kind.



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Smith's Nature Friendly Farm
Brookhaven, Mississippi
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